Category Archives: Artists

Artists at The Other Art Fair Bristol – 3 of 4

Still feeling inspired by artists I showed with at The Other Art Fair in Bristol. Here are more shots showing the wide variety of art as I whipped round before opening time.

Michelle Loa Kum Cheung’s landscapes,

Olivier Leger’s intricately detailed drawings, and Sara Dare’s suggestive abstract paintings.It’s not just me is it? The last post in this series follows next week.

Artists at The Other Art Fair Bristol – 2 of 4

There really is something for everyone at The Other Art Fair as, I hope, the following images and posts will show. It’s well worth a visit wherever it is.

From oil painted landscapes by Dawn Reader, another stand neighbour in Bristol,

to a new series of paintings by John Hainsworth ;meticulous still lives by Hisham Echafaki and large abstracts by Kate Williams More artists to follow…

The Other Art Fair Bristol – 1 of 4

Writing this as it rains outside, The Other Art Fair Bristol with sunbathers outside the Arnolfini Gallery now feels a long way off.

Every TOAF event has its communal displays with the ones here including The Colours of Bristol, an Instagram project created over 7 weeks with Bristol 247, @porthjess and @joyfulbristol – I saw it before opening time as you can see from the frenzied activity below. Next to my stand was the I,the Poet. You, The Poet project by Biba & Laurie Cole which was consistently busy as visitors drew images and thoughts with outsized pens and brushes.

Artist Joy Gerrard at Kingsgate Workshops

Another artist I discovered at Kingsgate workshops was Joy Gerrard, whose large ink and brush paintings of protest crowds caught my eye.

Again, all photos here are from her website as she was running a workshop when we popped in.

Often taken from rooftops, the original images are pulled from the media; compression, structure and constraint are all adjectives that come to mind when looking at the work which combines representation & abstraction.

All things splinter and collapse (Panel 1), ink on paper, 2015

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Protest Crowd, Yemen (2), ink on paper, 2012

Artist Anne Leigniel at Kingsgate Workshops

There’s nothing quite like visiting another artist’s studio to get an insight into their work so I make the most of open studios whenever I can.

I finally got to visit Kingsgate Workshops , workspace to a range of artists and makers and met  Anne Leigniel there.

The viewpoint of an artist towards their subject and how they explore their particular project always intrigues me. Her work spans drawing, photography, video and installation so please visit her website as there’s too much to cover here. The drawings were the first thing I saw and, before I start , all photos here are from her website as I didn’t take any shots during our conversation.

For her insect drawings she painted four large sheets of plastic in a field and left them overnight.

Upon returning in the morning insects had traced paths in the dew, adding their own marks to hers.

The results remind me of maps and mountain landscapes seen from the air.

Other drawings include pebbles, ochre drawings using an imaginary language

and drawings of journeys – this is of the 52 Bus, Chesterton Road to High St Kensington, London.

I now wish I had taken photos in her studio but am due to send her one of my painting rags for another long-running project  so expect to see her again fairly soon.

Richard Long at M-Shed in Bristol

I’d never been to Bristol before (a few hours passing through decades ago doesn’t really count) so gave myself a few hours to wander around the city before setting up for The Other Art Fair.

The area by the Arnolfini Gallery where we exhibited is really lovely with M-Shed just across the way.

And what should I come across but Richard Long‘s Muddy Water Walk stretching over 3 floors, the full height of the building.

It’s odd that I’d never connected his circular shapes with mine till now – it really is a universal form.

Young Masters at The Royal Overseas League in London

London Clubland (not the dancing type) is a world that most of us are only vaguely aware of and the Royal Overseas League is a case in point. A magnificent building tucked in a courtyard in St James and overlooking Green Park, it really is hidden away in the centre of London.

I’d heard about it but never actually been till very recently when invited to attend the Young Masters Art Prize exhibition, held there for the first time.

Organised by the Cynthia Corbett Gallery, the Young Masters celebrates artists “who pay homage to  the  skill and techniques of the past; knowing that young artists today are not afraid, unlike their predecessors, to look back at art history and its lessons.” Painting, photography, video and ceramics were all included.

This skylight and the next couple of photos give a small indication of the interior as well as how well the artwork sits within it.

Work by Antoine Schneck and Christoph Steinmeyer below.Isabelle van Zeijl‘s photography is on the left.These 3 photos by Sandro Miller (apologies for the photo quality but it was pretty dark) had me perplexed for a while but I got it by the third one. Can you?Lauren Nauman’s frail porcelain and brass piece below was only one of several ceramic artists shown.  ROSL, as it is commonly known, was the first London club to accept female members from the beginning and has an ongoing programme of art and music. For more information please visit the website.

Cerith Wyn Evans at the Duveen Gallery at Tate Britain

I’d seen a lot of this piece on social media and finally managed to visit it in person a week before it closed at Tate Britain’s wonderful Duveen Galleries.

Cerith Wyn Evans created this sculpture called Forms in Space…by Light (in Time) filling the gallery above our heads with neon shapes drawn in space. The structure begins with a circle

then 3 symbols used by opticians for eye tests , also used by Marcel Duchamp in his The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (the Large Glass)  

followed, as you walk through, by shapes initially inspired by the gestures of Japanese Noh theatre.

You don’t , of course have to view it from front to back; wandering around it gives so many different viewpoints.  I also wanted to mention the way the whole thing has been suspended – the support has a fascination of its own.You can see more of his work in London in the lobby of the recently opened Four Seasons hotel at 10 Trinity Square .

Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic. Tapestry at the National Gallery

The National Gallery is currently hosting Chris Ofili’s large tapestry woven by master weavers at the Dovecot Tapestry Studio for a commission by the Clothworkers’ Company.

Weaving Magic is the exhibition of “The Caged Bird’s Song”, set in a darkened room surrounded by a monochrome painted chorus of dancers.

The original painting below is in watercolour, a subtle medium where, due to rapid drying times, you have to work fast. This fluidity has been beautifully translated into the completely different and painstakingly slow medium of tapestry weaving.
Look how the painting below has been reproduced in a massively enlarged scale and in yarn. This took several master weavers over two and a half years to produce.Here are a couple of close-ups showing the blend of yarns. Such is the level of detail I went back to scour the watercolour to check whether what I saw in the tapestry was in the painting – it was. The tapestry will move to its permanent home at the Clothworkers’ Company at the end of August so visit the Sunley Room before then if you can.

In Light of the Machine – Conrad Shawcross at The Barbican

Part of the Barbican’s exhibition, Into The Unknown: A Journey Through Science Fiction, this installation by Conrad Shawcross is hidden 2 floors away from the rest of the show in The Pit so needs a bit of an effort to get down there.

I entered a dark space, where a kind of growling, almost animalistic sound came from a constantly moving machine in the middle of a henge made of lightweight perforated screens.

The  “creature” explores its space with a slow-moving probe, all the while making these sounds between organic and machine.

It’s worth seeing this installation after the main show as your mind is already full of  the imagery and tuned in to strangeness and connection with alien life forms.